Google wants to help Cure Your Boredom With Todays Google Doodle Mexican Game Loteria

 

Popular Google Doodle Games 2020: During COVID-19 google offers to Stay and Play at Home with Most Popular Google Doodle games. As COVID-19 continues to impact communities all over the world, nowadays people and families everywhere are spending more time at home. In this time Google wants to help cure your boredom amid lockdown with its most popular interactive google doodle games. Google Today’s interactive game Doodle celebrates the traditional Mexican card game, Lotería! It’s also google's second-ever multiplayer experience: Play the game with your friends in a private match, or match with users around the world at random.

Updated: May 07, 2020 11:30 IST

|

Monika

|

Google Doodle - Mexican Game Loteria

We can collaborate with five Mexican and Mexican-American illustrators to reimagine the classic Lotería game art for the Doodle along with some new cards for a fun surprise! We can partner with popular Mexican YouTuber Luisito Comunica, who serves in the iconic role of game card announcer for the Doodle. Lotería is wildly popular across Mexico and Latinx communities, whether as a Spanish language teaching tool or for family game night. Download the game and play safely at home. Watch Popular Google doodle Games video to learn the winning tricks.

History of the Game

Its origins in Italy in the 15th century, Lotería first moved to Spain before reaching Mexico in 1769. The rules are similar to bingo. In that, players mark spots on a tabla, or board, with a token (traditionally a raw bean) and attempt to fill it before all other players. A card announcer randomly pulls colorfully illustrated cards like “La Luna,” or “El Arbol,” and sometimes improvises poetic descriptions that match spaces on the tablas. A shout of “¡lotería!” or “¡buenas!” declares victory for one lucky player, ending the round. 

One of the best-known versions was created in Mexico by Frenchman Clemente Jacques in 1887. The Don Clemente Gallo edition, copyrighted in 1913. They mainly feature the imagery that’s become a form of folk art synonymous with Lotería.