Mistake is a mistake: Donald Trump warns China of

US President Donald Trump first pointed to China as the root of the pandemic by naming the coronavirus as the Chinese virus, which had already fuelled anti-Asian feelings in the country. Many US authorities have opted to name it the Wuhan virus, after the city where the epidemic is believed to have started. President Donald Trump said on Saturday that if it was found to be "knowingly responsible" for the novel coronavirus outbreak, China would face consequences.

by Niranjani Jesentha Kumari Prabagararaj

Updated: Apr 19, 2020 09:48 IST

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U.S. officials blamed China

It should have been stopped in China before it started, and it wasn't, and the entire world is suffering because of it," Trump said at the White House Task Force's regular briefing on coronavirus.

"If it's a mistake, mistake is a mistake," he said. "But if they were knowingly liable, yes, I think, then surely the consequences would have been." President Trump first started to point to China as the source of the pandemic by naming the coronavirus as the "Chinese virus," which fueled anti-Asian feelings that were already running through the country. Many US authorities have opted to name it the "Wuhan virus," after the city where the epidemic is believed to have started.

Some U.S. officials and Republican lawmakers blamed China on the grounds that it withheld the true nature of its outbreak; they cited intelligence reports.

When the American president was more critical of the slow and incompetent response of his administration to the disease, he went after the World Health Organization, accusing it of helping China to cover its severity or outbreak and mismanage its own response to the crisis.

Previously, President Trump said China's figures are "larger" than those of America, and that it has the "most" in the world. But he has not put forward any evidence to present that claim.

Does anyone honestly believe this number? "Trump said Saturday, referring to the estimated mortality rate of 0.33 per 100,000 people in China, on a chart provided at the Task Force Coordinator Deborah birx's briefing. 

In contrast, the death rate in the US is 11.24 per 100,000, which is much higher than the recorded figures in China, but much lower than some other countries like Belgium, which led the world with 45.2 deaths per 100,000, followed by Spain with 42.81, and Italy with 37.64.

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